SHTF Camping Gear

Underdude

Well-Known Member
When SHTF, what would you have?

Sleeping bags?
Tents?
Water purifier?
Tools?
Electronics?
Perimeter breach warning devices?
Clothing?
Camoflauge pattern?
Rain gear?
Fire starting?
MREs and dried foods?
Water/Survival food rationing?
Don't forget the brand names.....

Here's mine....
Snugpak Merlin 3 season bag
Kelty bivy shelter
Katadyn filter pump and tablets
Gerber camp axe, Spec-Plus 5.5 in blade, small socket set and bits, Gerber multi-tool
Garmin GPS
Trip wires
Wolverine boots, extra socks/chonies, windproof fleece Outfitter camo
Goretex packable rain gear
Solid fuel, matches, my own design of magnesium fire sticks, cotton, 9v batteries
Beefsteak mre entrees, rice, instant mash
Mainstay food and water rations
 

Dirk Pitt

Well-Known Member
I'm lucky I save lots of money by using uncle sam issue stuff :D

US Military sleeping system including bivy sack (tents are for sissies)
Tarp with poncho linear
ALICE Large Rucksack
Iodine pills
Kukri, E-Tool, Gerger LMF, Leatherman Wave, Zero tolerance ZT301
Garmin GPS, Casio Pathfinder watch with compass, barometer, thermometer, and altimeter
Two pairs of Belleville boots (one goretex one ventilated), Merell Chameleon all terrain shoes, Woolrich Elite cargo pants, fleece, neck gator, beanie, polypro, M65 jacket, Goretex system
Three cases of MREs
Camelbak, two 1 quart canteens with canteen cup
Interceptor Body Armor
Light Weight Helmet

Oh ya and guns and ammo!
 

Low Branch

Well-Known Member
I use my general hiking pack that has over 4000 miles in its life. I am a light-weight backpacker and carry around 8-12 lbs. before food and depending on the season. If you are not a backpacker, gear always seems more important than it is. Generally, long-distance hikers learn real quick what they can shed and what they need. Trial and error. Want to hear from them about their gear, simply head up to the mountains at the right times and wait, just remember to bring sodas and candy. Hikers will talk your ears off about gear and stories with food as an incentive. You can see lots of them at Newfound Gap in the Smokies between mid-April and June, but with so many tourists there the hikers are in high demand. Head to either end of the Appalachian Trail in the Smokies during the same time and you will find plenty every day (Fontana Dam and exit 451 on I-40 in TN). These hikers have spent plenty of time in cold weather, at least one solid snow-storm, a few thunderstorms along ridge-lines, and more cold mornings than you can shake a stick at in addition to the nearly 300 miles of trail they have covered. Go further north to Hot Springs and there are a lot of hikers there who are taking a zero hiking day since this is the first town the trail runs through. The south-bound hikers will hit these same areas from October through December and they are nearing 2000 miles at this point.
 

Underdude

Well-Known Member
Too hardcore for me low branch, I'm not walking that far for fun.

Next.........Tents are for sissies? I like my bivy, at least I'll be a dry sissy. My Merlin is waterproof as well. How much does that Interceptor system weigh?
I went with Armorshield. Got plates? What do you prefer?
 

Low Branch

Well-Known Member
Plenty of long-distance hikers use bivy sacks, so you are far from wrong there. I use a tarp-tent and a piece of Tyvek as a ground cloth. The tarp-tent is a simple piece of light-weight sil-nylon and weighs in at 14 oz. with stakes and two tie-downs. I use hiking poles to give it shape and I always stay dry with it. I have a bug-net that drapes from underneath so I could shave off more weight by dumping that.

I do not know how much the Interceptor system weighs with plates in size XL. I do know I can wear it comfortably for an entire day with walking and shooting. I had to test this out so I would know if I ever had to wear it, which I doubt I will.

Even though you may not wish to walk that far for fun, the people who do know a lot about gear and their knowledge directly transfers into a SHTF situation where you are left with no choice but to move around from place to place. If you are able to remain static then this type of gear is not for you, but should the situation cause you to be out for an extended walk then they have the experience. Seriously, people should visit Whiteblaze.net and watch the forums about light-weight gear and the many opinions and comparisons.

ETA: I just realized you are in CA, so replace AT with PCT. Same gear and same attitudes.
 

Low Branch

Well-Known Member
Hold your tongue! There are no unfaithful politicians, you must be crazy. Gov. Sanford was on the AT while not being involved with a woman outside of his marriage regardless of what the media says. It was all a lie, wasn't it?
 

Dirk Pitt

Well-Known Member
Underdude said:
Next.........Tents are for sissies? I like my bivy, at least I'll be a dry sissy. My Merlin is waterproof as well. How much does that Interceptor system weigh?
I went with Armorshield. Got plates? What do you prefer?
I classify tents and bivies as two different items. But what I meant is I like hiking and camping where you are actually outside and not bringing all the comforts of home with you.
 

Underdude

Well-Known Member
I have both, one bivy and three tents. I hate getting rid of them but like buying new ones every couple of years.
But I don't like sleeping out in the open. Bitey scratchy things worry me.
Growing up I had strange pets, spiders, scorpions, and snakes. Tarantula bit me, scorpion got me twice, and I got nailed by a black widow. Scorpions felt like hornet stings, black widow felt like I got burned and hit with a sledgehammer.
Trust me, don't mess with them, and I don't want to find out what a rattlesnake bite feels like.
 
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