Not legal in SC???

C_Carson

New Member
IIRC, it has something to do with the alloy and heat temperature...which sounds really stupid, but that's government for ya.
 

thebrasilian

New Member
The test is 800 to 1000 degrees.

If this is true than how do some of the Diamondback pistol get sold in SC? They use Zamac for some of the slides which have a melting point in the 700+ range?
 

PCShogun

Member
Yeah, they call it the "Saturday Night Special" law here in S.C. and it does relate to the temperature the frame can withstand. They did not want a gun that can be easily destroyed after a crime. How a polymer frame gets past, I have no clue.

I was looking for a fun little .22 and saw one from Phoenix Arms with 3 and 5 inch barrels. Can't buy it here for the same reason.
 
Some GSG and Chiappa 1911 .22s seem to get good reviews, and most of them are not able to be sold in SC.

I have been wanting one to plink with, but noooooo, the SC goberment knows best. :roll:

Sometimes I see some of these guns in the South Carolina section of Amrslist from private sellers. The only way I can think they get the guns is they move here with them or illegally purchase them out of state.

Eff the BATF and eff SC politics. Guess I should throw an "eff the federal government and all of it's agencies" out there, too.
 

thebrasilian

New Member
This is a silly law. Do they know how hard it is for someone to create a fire hot enough to melt something like this? Zamak needs a minimum of 715 degrees to melt. To hold that requires a lot of energy for a long period of time. Not to mention that the barrel is still steel. Government logic I guess.
 

PCShogun

Member
Well, we could get together and write a letter to our representatives? They may just not be aware that the law is on the books or that its intent is now obsolete. Explaining how plastic polymer and many alloys can no longer handle those temperatures, yet are stronger and safer than many materials that do qualify may be a way of pointing this out. I'd need to research the facts further though.
 
PCShogun said:
Well, we could get together and write a letter to our representatives? They may just not be aware that the law is on the books or that its intent is now obsolete. Explaining how plastic polymer and many alloys can no longer handle those temperatures, yet are stronger and safer than many materials that do qualify may be a way of pointing this out. I'd need to research the facts further though.
There is a bill that is sitting in the House Judiciary Committee that will do that and more, H. 3665. Maybe we should emailing and calling the committee members that to tell them to get it reviewed so it an head to the house. H3292 is back in the Judiciary Committee, as well. Once the NRA releases what changes they made to H. 3292, we should get on that as well, hopefully the NRA hasn't screwed it up, but I digress.

Part of H. 3665 repeals SECTION 23-31-180.

SECTION 23-31-180. Certain pistols declared to be contraband; forfeiture, seizure, and destruction; disposal restrictions; use for display.

No licensed retail dealer may hold, store, handle, sell, offer for sale, or otherwise possess in his place of business a pistol or other handgun which has a die-cast, metal alloy frame or receiver which melts at a temperature of less than eight hundred degrees Fahrenheit.

A pistol or other handgun possessed or sold by a dealer in violation of this article is declared to be contraband and must be forfeited to or seized by the law enforcement agency in the municipality where forfeited or seized or to the law enforcement agency in the county where forfeited or seized if forfeited or seized outside a municipality. The weapon must be destroyed by the law enforcement agency which seized the weapon or the law enforcement agency to which the weapon is forfeited. A weapon must not be disposed of in any manner until the results of any legal proceeding in which it may be involved are finally determined.

However, a law enforcement agency may use the weapon for display purposes after the weapon has been rendered inoperable.
 

armaborealis

New Member
PCShogun said:
Yeah, they call it the "Saturday Night Special" law here in S.C. and it does relate to the temperature the frame can withstand. They did not want a gun that can be easily destroyed after a crime. How a polymer frame gets past, I have no clue.

I was looking for a fun little .22 and saw one from Phoenix Arms with 3 and 5 inch barrels. Can't buy it here for the same reason.
I didn't think the melt point laws had anything to do with preventing destruction of firearms used in crime... How many criminals have you ever read about who melt guns in 600 degree ovens after using it in a crime?

There is a lot of documentation however about how these "Saturday Night Special" laws were intended to remove inexpensive firearms from the market, preventing poorer people from having access to cheaper guns. I don't know the history of South Carolina's law in specific but that intent to create an economic barrier to firearms ownership has been written about for a bunch of other states, going back to Tennessee's "Army Navy" law after the civil war.

An author called Marcus Funk has some articles discussing these types of laws (http://www.constitution.org/2ll/2ndschol/109mar.pdf).
 

PCShogun

Member
Yes, I went back and re-read the law for our state and several others. They all use the term "Junk Guns" and "Unsafe Firearms" yet don't all guns have to be tested before they can be licensed as safe for sale to the public? Since all guns are "Proofed", how are they considered unsafe for home defense?

South Carolina is one of several states that uses a "Melting Point test". The "Melting Point Test" requires that the working components of a firearm be composed of metals that will not melt under the heat generated by the firing of that weapon, thus preventing the gun from being structurally weakened. I believe South Carolina has set this temperature at 800 degrees. I was told by our friends at ATP that this test was to prevent the easy destruction of the firearm after a crime. I guess I should have considered the source.

By the way, the melting point of zinc is around 700 degrees. My Hi-Point firearm, which are legally sold here in SC, uses ZAMAK-3, a zinc/aluminum alloy (96% zinc, 4% aluminum) and melts at a slightly higher temperature of 729 degrees. How this one got through the melt test, I don't know. Hi-Point states that the parts made from zamak-3 (receiver and bolt/slide) are low-stress components that do not require the strength and expense of steel. Higher stress components in Hi-Points, like the barrel and other small parts, are made of steel. However, the law states its intent to prevent the heat of firing and operation from structurally weakening the weapon to render it unsafe. How the Hi-point passes this qualification, I don't know. I still shoot it though and have passed several hundred rounds through it.
 

Stan in SC

New Member
I don't think it is about the firearm being able to easily be destroyed after being used illegally as much as it is about them being cheaper and more easily obtainable since they are made cheaper.The whole concept is stupid and should never have been made a law.

Stan in SC
 

SquirrelSlayer

New Member
for information purposes only you can do a youtube search about constructing a simple blast furnace. I have thought about making one to melt down junk brass and aluminum, but I already have too many hobbies and have downsized most of them already.

Watch some videos of people pouring molten brass and steel that's some hot dangerous stuff, I know I would burn my house down on accident if I tried. Good thing I know my limitations.

All I need is for some nosy old lady to call the cops saying my foundry is a moonshine still or meth lab. If a crimminal was smart enough he would probably not be killing people he would be in politics with the rest of the smart crimminals.
 

Dave29461

Active Member
Tigerstripe said:
but now you can buy a scandium S&W for $1000.00. bet it will melt at 600 degrees.
1541 degrees Celsius

2805 degrees Fahrenheit

I don't care who you are... that's hot. Git 'er done :lol:
 

GUNSMOAK

New Member
Not legal in SC??? CORRECTED information

The SC Law states that a "Licensed Dealer" may not receive, transfer, or possess at his business any of these banned arms. I have looked, but have not found where someone cannot bring one of these arms into the State AS LONG AS IT IS LEGALLY OBTAINED. (IE., Legally purchased and moved w/ household).

Some States REQUIRE that ANY transfer of a Firearm be documented. Some States require that the documentation be such paperwork including ATF 4473 and include NCIC or other Instant background check.

FEDERAL FIREARMS REGULATION REFERENCE GUIDE, Q&A (B16)para3 states:
"Please note that if a private person wants to obtain a firearm from a private person who resides in another State, the firearm will have to be shipped to an FFL in the buyer's State."

FEDERAL LAW DICTATES that a Licensed Dealer transfer handguns ONLY to lawful Residents of the State of his FFL Address.

I hold a SC SLED Retail Pistol License and FFL. This information is correct to the best of my knowledge. If I ever find otherwise, I intend to speak up and correct this post. REally.

GUNSMOAK
 
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