My Automatic Induction Annealing Project

Nov 12, 2009
36
Charleston, SC
#1
Hello all;

As many of you know I have become rather fascinated with annealing using induction heat. I had a thread on this forum a while back showing how I was doing it, and the results I was getting. Many of you replied enthusiastically and for that I thank you.

I am working on making an automatic machine to anneal cases (the I.C.A. 2000) and hope to be able to bring it to market in the near future. I would like to get some input from you guys on what you would be looking for in an annealer before I build/buy the next set of parts.

What cartidges do you reload? Specifically I am looking for the largest and smallest cases (including pistol) that you would/do anneal. I had considered making the machine to handle the monster 50 BMG, but I'm not sure that demand is high enough for the 50 to make it worth the diminshed performance with smaller cartridges.

What other features would you like to see in my induction annealing machine?

Any advice you offer is much appreciated as I try to develop the I.C.A. 2000.
 

Kazhrei

New Member
Jan 4, 2010
83
Hill AFB, UT
#4
I could be wrong...and I usually am

I normally notice the folks who anneal their cases are mainly rifle calibers and they are usually doing it to help ensure as much accuracy as possible.

It does help ensure a longer life for the case though yes?
 
Nov 12, 2009
36
Charleston, SC
#6
Yes, annealing does help prolong case life by stress relieving the brass.

Every time a case is fired and resized it work hardens the case, annealing removes that hardening and helps to ensure consistent neck tension. Both of these result in longer case life and more accurate ammunition.
 

Kazhrei

New Member
Jan 4, 2010
83
Hill AFB, UT
#7
Ok...more questions.

Is there a need to anneal with handgun calibers if you're not going for extreme accuracy? Is it just easier to just check your brass and do a (2-3 fires and junk) rotation?
 
Nov 12, 2009
36
Charleston, SC
#8
I'm not sure of whether or not annealing seriously helps pistol brass. I've not done it yet. I do now that 2-3 firings is way too few for pistol brass. I'm up to six or seven without problems on my .40's. I wouldn't scrap pistol brass until the pockets loosen up or the neck splits.
 

Kazhrei

New Member
Jan 4, 2010
83
Hill AFB, UT
#9
So pistol brass is pretty long lived as long as you're sure to weed out the ones with cracks/bulges/etc...

Awesome. I keep contemplating getting into rolling my own, but then other obligations come up and it keeps getting back burnered. :cry: