Handloaded ammo shelf-life?

Parhams0508

New Member
Someone once told me that factory ammo lasts a whole lot longer than homemade ammo...something to do with being produced in a vacuum or whatever.

Is that the case? Do reloaded munitions "expire" sooner than factory-produced rounds?

Thanks for the input!
 

Clicker

Member
That somebody was blowing smoke up your skirt! The only advantage to factory ammo (over handloads) would be their use of sealant on the primer & case mouth. Just store your ammo in military cans with a good gasket and it should out last you.

I have primed cases that are 15 years old which still go boom when I load and shoot them. These have been stored in a plastic jar in an unconditioned garage space.

I'm betting Jeff at P1 can shed more light on this subject.
 

mark_b

Member
I can beat that, I found some reloads and supplies at my dad's house I had made back in 1982 - the date was still on the label when I reloaded them. They were stuck in the back of a cabinet out of sight.

They were 45 acp loaded with unique powder and 230 grain full metal jacket bullets. They went bang just fine last year, no hang fires and no accuracy issues, other than my own shooting skills. There were a few hundred CCI primers that were still in the original packaging. I loaded them into some 45s and shot them without any issue too.

I also found the other half of the box of Hornady bullets they came from. I bought them from Doug Kiesler when he ran his business as a small gun shop in Greenville Indiana. He is now one of the biggest policy and military supply houses in the country, here is his website in case you have not heard of him:

http://www.kiesler.com/

So, I would say that the shelf life of handloads is no different than factory loads. Store like recommended by Clicker and you will be good to go.

Mark
 

HOLY DIVER

New Member
mark_b said:
I can beat that, I found some reloads and supplies at my dad's house I had made back in 1982 - the date was still on the label when I reloaded them. They were stuck in the back of a cabinet out of sight.

They were 45 acp loaded with unique powder and 230 grain full metal jacket bullets. They went bang just fine last year, no hang fires and no accuracy issues, other than my own shooting skills. There were a few hundred CCI primers that were still in the original packaging. I loaded them into some 45s and shot them without any issue too.

I also found the other half of the box of Hornady bullets they came from. I bought them from Doug Kiesler when he ran his business as a small gun shop in Greenville Indiana. He is now one of the biggest policy and military supply houses in the country, here is his website in case you have not heard of him:

http://www.kiesler.com/

So, I would say that the shelf life of handloads is no different than factory loads. Store like recommended by Clicker and you will be good to go.

Mark
oh yea did i add i loaded these 38 specials when i was 11 years old top that! ofcorse my dad closely watched but he allways made a note on the labels if i loaded them lol
 

Parhams0508

New Member
swiss said:
Use model airplane "dope" around the case mouth and primer, and they will fire just fine after submersion in water for a week. I did this by mistake, meaning to shoot them the next day, but I forgot! :) The bullet was a cast lead swc, with 50-50 Aloxy beeswax lube. .45 ACP.
Is the dope around the bullet in between the bullet and the case? If it's on the outside, wouldn't that eventually cause feeding and extraction issues?

To all of you guys, I really appreciate your experience and advice. Thanks a thousand times!
 

Tom

Member
I still have some .38 Spcl and .45 ACPs I reloaded when I first started out in 1993. They have been stored in ammo cans, carried in a motor home, storage building (unregulated), under the bed, trunk of a car etc. and fire every single time. Ed Banks, an ex-Air Force armorer and master gunsmith taught me reloading amongst many other tidbits of wisdom; some of which were so simplistic that some scoff at them. i.e. no matter if you see someone else check the action/cylinder of a firearm, when they pass it to you, you check it also. Saves a BIG unwanted surprise.
 
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